Weekend heat could be dangerous for some in NH

The heat expected in New Hampshire can be dangerous to people’s health.A heat advisory is in effect for southern parts of New Hampshire on Saturday and Sunday, when the heat index could exceed 95 degrees at times. The heat index measures how hot it feels, based on temperature and humidity.This is the first time a heat advisory has been issued in New Hampshire for May. Typically, when temperatures reach the 90s this month, they’re not accompanied by summer-like humidity, so the dry heat doesn’t meet the criteria of issuing a heat advisory.A few years ago, after talking with the medical community, the National Weather Service lowered the threshold to a heat index of 95 degrees, instead of it needing to reach the lower 100s.”They were showing when they get increased hospital visits due to heat exhaustion, heatstroke, and they ended up finding that their visits came in on days well below our current heat advisory criteria,” said Donny Dumont, coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Gray, Maine.Historically, the warm weather has meant more calls to first responders.Chris Stawasz of American Medical Response said, “We find an influx of people doing things they are so excited to be doing outside they just forget the safety rules and they make mistakes and they get themselves into trouble whether it’s diving or horseplay Or things like that when they’re all outside together.” Medical experts say people should take care during the high heat and humidity, remembering to stay hydrated, take breaks, limit outdoor activity and check on pets and people more susceptible to heat illness.

The heat expected in New Hampshire can be dangerous to people’s health.

A heat advisory is in effect for southern parts of New Hampshire on Saturday and Sunday, when the heat index could exceed 95 degrees at times. The heat index measures how hot it feels, based on temperature and humidity.

This is the first time a heat advisory has been issued in New Hampshire for May. Typically, when temperatures reach the 90s this month, they’re not accompanied by summer-like humidity, so the dry heat doesn’t meet the criteria of issuing a heat advisory.

A few years ago, after talking with the medical community, the National Weather Service lowered the threshold to a heat index of 95 degrees, instead of it needing to reach the lower 100s.

“They were showing when they get increased hospital visits due to heat exhaustion, heatstroke, and they ended up finding that their visits came in on days well below our current heat advisory criteria,” said Donny Dumont, warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Gray, Maine.

Historically, the warm weather has meant more calls to first responders.

Chris Stawasz of American Medical Response said, “We find an influx of people doing things they are so excited to be doing outside they just forget the safety rules and they make mistakes and they get themselves into trouble whether it’s diving or horseplay or things like that when they’re all outside together.”

Medical experts say people should take care during the high heat and humidity, remembering to stay hydrated, take breaks, limit outdoor activity and check on pets and people more susceptible to heat illness.

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